156 Resources

Harsh Realities in Artist Relations

Bruce Warren, Gary Scott, Kyle Smith
2015 - Pittsburgh

The dynamics of artist relations at music radio are changing by the minute. Radio, artists, managers and labels have separate agendas with evolving business and legal models. As the business models evolve, legal releases are increasingly difficult to get signed as labels attempt to leverage their music and artists in new ways. Booking bands for station events is more competitive than ever. Getting artists to engage in station promotion around their events has great upside, but is a maze of challenges to accomplish. In some cases, artists are the critical ingredient in revenue-based member events.

The Missing Half: Finding Women's Voices in Media

Kristin Calhoun, Susan Marjetti, Lynne Clendenin, Kathy Merritt

Women make up 50% of the world's population, but, according to research, they are seen and heard only 24% of the time in global news media today. Where is the other half of women? Find out what public media is doing to ensure that women are fully represented in our content and in our leadership.

The Host Who Knew Too Much

2015 - Pittsburgh

Are your music experts radio experts? You can help them be both, and connect them to the audience your station really has and wants. Join our discussion about working with seasoned talent in the classical and jazz formats and developing promising new voices.

Triple A’s Got Talent…or Does It?

Mark Abuzzahab, Lindsay Kimball, Scott Mullins, Gary Scott
2015 - Pittsburgh

What is the role of talent on Music Discovery stations?  How do you handle the challenges of working with tenured talent, as well as brand new talent?  Why aren’t there more established personalities in this format?  Can Music Discovery stations live on music alone?  Is the format in need of a national show featuring a well-known artist or personality?  

PRPD Brave New World: Best Practices in the New NPR Clocks

Ben Adler, Peter Dominowski, Dan Klefstad, Tanya Ott

Nearly a year ago, the public radio system jumped headfirst into a brave new world: new NPR show clocks that upended decades of comfort and complacency. What have we learned in this first year? How can we best insert vibrant local content seamlessly into the national show? And how can stations of all sizes maximize flexibility to put their strongest content on the air when the length of that content might change from day to day?

Talent Development Super Session

Mary Hockaday, Ellen McDonnell, John Barth, Dean Cappello
2015 - Pittsburgh

It’s a talent business and we all have to grow our careers – and the people who connect us to the audience. For the first time, the PRPD Conference will bring together public media practitioners who have clear and substantial track records in the area of managing talent and guiding talent development at the highest levels.

Putting the "Video" in Public Radio

2015 - Pittsburgh

More and more Americans are turning to digital video sources to get news and information, as well as to discover new music. Public Media has an opportunity to think beyond its traditional pubcasting boundaries to serve both current and new audiences with local perspectives.

AIR’s The Making of Story: Talk/Listen/Hear

Shereen Marisol Meraji
2015 - Pittsburgh

The sound of words matter.  In each of our cities and towns, from one block to the next, our common language may have dozens of variations.  How can public radio makers listen, hear, speak and make story choices in new ways so our streams and broadcasts better reflect our changing role in community?

The State of Public Radio Audience

Jennifer Strachan, Fred Jacobs, Larry Rosin, Dave Sullivan
2015 - Pittsburgh

This session will be a deep dive into how culture-wide audio usage trends, public radio-specific audience trends, and the ubiquitous tech we rely on is impacting YOUR station and community.

Seeing Change As Opportunity

Eric Nuzum
2015 - Pittsburgh

The human need remains the same - tell me something interesting, make it matter and do it well. The rapid expansion of platforms and the shifting delivery and measurement systems don't change who we are as people inasmuch as they give us more options.

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